Riding the ESG Wave by Investing in Water

Thematic products have become a critical part of the investing landscape by providing investors focused exposure to a sector or a group of companies in order to capitalize on a specific and timely trend. In that vein, today’s note highlights the global water sector. While so commonplace it is easy to overlook, the water industry could be an ESG-friendly investment opportunity with a solid outlook driven by expectations for rising global demand for water and a growing emphasis on managing water responsibly.

Read the full piece here.

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